Archive for May 2, 2017


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Today we’re talking to the local Venture Agent of the Pathfinder Society, CJ Masungsong!

For the uninitiated, the Pathfinder Society is the Pathfinder RPG’s Organized Play initiative! Here’s a quick in-character look at their lore:

We are the Pathfinder Society, a legendary league of explorers, archaeologists, and adventurers dedicated to discovering and chronicling the greatest mysteries and wonders of an ancient world beset by magic and evil.

The society’s home base is sprawling Absalom, the so-called City at the Center of the World that stands astride the great Inner Sea on the mountain-capped Isle of Kortos.

A Pathfinder explores the dark alleys and political intrigues of Absalom between far-flung travels to the most interesting and exotic locales in the world.

It’s no secret that Pathfinder was a huge deal when it came out, and I’m a little suprised that it took us this long to get our very own Venture Agent for the Philippines.  But hey, I’m just glad we finally do! Organized Play organizations are a great way to push the hobby, so having more can only be a good thing to the hobby.

But enough talk about PFS, let’s have a quick interview with CJ.

1) So, why don’t you tell us a bit about yourself and how you got into the hobby in general.

Sure thing! I’ve always been a hardcore video game geek growing up. The moment I figured out how to operate our 486 PC back in 92′, I already saw my future as a RPG fanatic.

It wasn’t long until I came across Baldur’s gate and Neverwinter Nights, that introduced me to the D20 system. I started getting curious about the so called table top franchise that these games originated from. I have to tell you, it wasn’t easy. Up where I was, Novaliches, to be exact, tabletop RPGs were not really readily available at the time, even in the 2000s.  I never gave up though.     I was able to get my hands on old D&D scans and started briefing my gaming group about it. It was met with utter disapproval at first, mainly because we were coming from a long line of PC games, and yeah WoW was awesome then lol.
I was able convince majority of them though which led to a couple of 3.5 games that lasted for about a couple of months. Then we stopped because we didn’t see the value. It was too much work at the time, for so small a return we thought.
After a year or so, I saw the D&D episode of the “community”. It was so much fun that I decided to give it another shot. But this time, I told a friend at work that I knew was running small private events. It turned out, they were using the Pathfinder system, and I was exposed to the main differences between the two, like power attack reducing your attack rolls instead of your AC. And for me that made a lot of sense.
I challenged myself to run an adventure path with my guys of about 10 – 11 players. Took us two and a half years to finish, but gave us a front row seat of character development from level 1 to 20. And the rest is history.

2) How did you get into Pathfinder, and why did you pick the Pathfinder Society over the Dungeons & Dragons Adventurer’s League?

PF came from D&D 3.5, which to me is a classic. Some might say that the math is not noob-friendly, but everybody starts at level 1. And at level 1, the math isn’t that difficult. You just need to understand the logic behind the computations and your all set. More importantly though, it’s the customizations that got me. They are limitless… You see a character you like in a TV show? You can probably recreate a PF version.
I haven’t really tried AL, but I’ve read enough to have an idea how it goes. I think it’s pretty awesome too, I just prefer to play games in hard mode. :p

3) What are the requirements to join the Pathfinder Society?’

Well, pen and paper and a whole lot of imagination lol. But seriously though, you need the core rule book to to start. If you want customizations, you need to get the specific book where the feature is. A PDF costs about $9.99, so pretty manageable.

4) What kind of adventures and experiences does the PFS offer to players? Do they have any sort of reward system in place?

To give you a brief background of who the Pathfinders are, think about them like a guild of Lara Crofts. Archaeologists, Adventurers, Scholars, who stumble on different legends/artifacts, and end up making the world a safer place to live in. A scenario can run from 4 – 6 hours depends on the performance of players. Just right for any casual or hardcore player to enjoy.
In terms of rewards, players are awarded prestige points and boons by their specific factions which they can use to purchase equipment or to train their characters.

5) You mentioned that you were very impressed with the Factions of the Pathfinder Society, can you tell us a bit about them, and how they operate? Do they often have opposing agendas?

Indeed! I think the factions are what makes every game interesting. Each player is given a sub-quest by their respective faction. If you fulfill it along with the main quest, you get additional prestige points. And yes they sometimes end-up opposing each other, so it’s up to the players how they can find a compromise.
Explore. Report. Cooperate. These are the pillars of the society. If anybody goes against it, you become the enemy.

6) What other activities do you have in store for the community?

Since our launch, we’re planning on running bi-monthly events on either North and South locations to cater to all players. We’ve also asked Paizo.com, the publishers for support programs so we can give out freebies to faithful members.
Also, they’ve recently released multi-table campaigns which I find really interesting. They are scenarios that have to run with a minimum of 6 tables. There are DMs per table, but there’s one head DM to rule them all. It’ll be awesome to try that!

7) Is there anything else you’d like to say to the readers to get them to join the Pathfinder Society?

Absalom is the great city at the center of the world. For centuries, different nations have tried conquer it only to find themselves falling victim to it’s strategic position and stalwart defenders. A few more years pass, and there’s relative peace. Little does the city know that there’s an armada of ancient, forgotten invaders, just waiting for the signal to strike. And this time, they will not be stopped.
So that’s a sample of what a single scenario awaits you. PFS has combined the roleplaying magic of the classic D&D 3.5 classic modules with superior story-telling.
Lastly, I’m a firm believer that bi-monthly creative conflict resolution exercises are essential to one’s experience and career growth. So tabletop roleplaying games are a must.
You don’t believe me? Then try dropping by any of our upcoming events, and I’ll show you 🙂
Thanks for taking the time to answer our questions, CJ! Next up I’ll put up a few answers fro the point of view of a player of the PFS games!